1 April, This day in history——Wangari Maathai's Birthday

EagleHeadline | Jun. 17, 2017

WangariMuta Maathai (1 April 1940 – 25 September 2011) was an internationally renowned Kenyan environmental political activist and Nobel laureate. She was educated in the United States at Mount St. Scholastica (Benedictine College) and the University of Pittsburgh, as well as the University of Nairobi in Kenya.

In 1977, Maathai founded the Green Belt Movement, an environmental non-governmental organization focused on the planting of trees, environmental conservation, and women's rights. In 1984, she was awarded the Right Livelihood Award, and in 2004, she became the first African woman to receive the Nobel Peace Prize for "her contribution to sustainable development, democracy and peace". Maathai was an elected member of Parliament and served as assistant minister for Environment and Natural Resources in the government of President MwaiKibaki between January 2003 and November 2005. She was an Honorary Councillor of the World Future Council. In 2011, Maathai died of complications from ovarian cancer.

Wangari Maathai holding a trophy awarded to her by the Kenya National Commission on Human Rights.

Maathai in Nairobi with Chancellor of the Exchequer (and later Prime Minister) Gordon Brown in 2005.

Maathai and then-U.S. SenatorBarack Obama in Nairobi in 2006.

Wangari Maathai speaks about deforestation.

“Nothing is more beautiful than cultivating the land at dusk. At that time of day in the central highlands the air and the soil are cool, the sun is going down, the sunlight is golden against the ridges and the green of trees, and there is usually a breeze. As you remove the weeds and press the earth around the crops you feel content, and wish the light would last longer so you could cultivate more. Earth and water, air and waning fire of the sun combine to form the essential elements of life and reveal to me my kinship with the soil. When I was a child I sometimes became so absorbed working in the fields with my machete that I didn’t notice the end of the day until it got so dark that I could no longer differentiate between the weeds and crops. At that point I knew it was time to go home, on the narrow paths that criss crossed the fields and rivers and woodlots.”

WangariMuta Maathai – Unbowed, p. 47.

“Although I was a highly educated woman, it did not seem odd to me to work with my hands, often with my knees on the ground, alongside rural woman. Some politicians and others in the 1980s and 1990s ridiculed me for doing so. But I had no problem with it, and the rural women both accepted and appreciated that I was working with them to improve their lives and the environment. After all, I was a child of the same soil. Education, if it means anything, should not take people away from land, but instill in them even more respect for it, because educated people are in a position to understand what is being lost. The future of the planet concerns all of us, and we should do what we can to protect it. As I told the foresters, and the women, you don't need a diploma to plant a tree.”

WangariMuta Maathai – Unbowed, pp. 137–138.

Hot Comments
Marcelline Paulette ADJOVI2017-04-15 11:52:42 Nigeria
"Could" and not "coule". Sorry&&&
Marcelline Paulette ADJOVI2017-04-15 11:51:06 Nigeria
I happened to know Mrs Wangari Mataai. She was such a brave woman who coule clearly ans frankly air her views.
Majok Akuecbeny Majok2017-04-15 11:19:05 Uganda
If African leaders imitate such desirable spirit, Africa continent would have been a better place for generations without corruption and wars.
Philip Ibonye2017-04-14 07:10:18 Nigeria
Wonderful, I'm really touched. What a great person.
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